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for by taxes. you might have to pay more taxes if you get more government services. but at the same time, many of the same americans who an in a limited government way when asked that question by pollsters do not in fact want the federal government to stop doing a lot of things it currently does. or don't see it as having a immediate or near term cost to them. i think there are two examples we enhance late as well. i'm going to focus on people more conservative than moderate. the new york thymes did a story on the tea party, than quoted a woman named jo i did white. she said she was conflicted with the entitlement and things like that. he said, you know, i guess i want my social security, and smaller government too. which is, you know, there are people who are ought to be more familiar with the workings of the federal budget than random people quoted in news stories who nevertheless take this similar viewpoint. dick morris, the political consult assistant who moved from the democrat to the republicans who is famous for the prediction of the romney presidency -- [laughter] that very, you know,
to the budget. the republicans are going to want more tax cuts -- more spending cuts, and the democrats are going to want more tax increases, and i think you'd end up with something that is about 50/50 but that would really be both of them would want to be the pair that solved the yawning budget gap. so, and, you know, i look at my governor, mitch daniels, who i served under -- who's a republican, and he came this and, you know, he -- it was so important for him to change things, to shake things up and -- health care. he pushed an expansion of our medicaid program. with a cigarette tax increase. my god, that sounds pretty democratic. but it, you know, he wanted to leave a legacy with health care. and the one thing that made it republican was it had the health savings account approach. but any, all the other elements -- expanding medicaid to include working adults who didn't have kids and funding with the cigarette tax -- that comes out of the democratic playbook. so, and even our new governor, mike pence, who headed the republican study group when he was a hebb of congress which is -- m
be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft spot, but we'll see. >> how much of this is consumer confidence, do you think? >> consumer confidence definitely plays a role. but consumers right now don't have the money to spend. and if they went out and spent, they'd be borrowing money. i don't think -- i think it's a more fundamental problem in a way than consumer confidence. >> steve, my long wait yesterday trying to get up to new york, in the lounge was tim geithner waiting for the flight, as well. i asked him, we're seeing these good signs in the economy, how much of it
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3